phoenix writes

or procrastinates, one of the two

10,427 notes

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read
To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.
These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my consciousness that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.
While there are loads of other great books on writing, I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”—the topics of these books are very diverse!
Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it! (Addendum 9/22/14: I saw her speak at the BKBF yesterday and she is SO COOL.)
On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long time—like, 6 months or a year—and come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!
Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!
The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!
Elements of Style by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a gift—for high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all about—gasp!—grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-y—I really want this illustrated copy!
If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritingbooks and I’ll reblog you! 

yeahwriters:

5 Books on Writing That Every Writer Should Read

To be a better writer, there are really only things that you need to do: Read, and write. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t read about being a writer, and that having a well-rounded understanding of how writing “works” isn’t beneficial.

These 5 books were all assigned to me as a creative writing undergrad, and all have pieces of wisdom in them that have etched themselves so thoroughly into my consciousness that I feel like they’re all floating over my head while I’m writing.

While there are loads of other great books on writing, I specifically chose these because they aren’t all just saying “here’s how I write, you should do it too”the topics of these books are very diverse!

  1. Reading Like A Writer by Francine Prose: Like I said, the best thing you can do to be a better writer is read. But what does that mean? What should you read? Francine Prose (yes, that is her real last name, if you can even believe it!) helps you answer those questions, and shows how looking for certain things while you read and reread can strengthen your own writing. Check it! (Addendum 9/22/14: I saw her speak at the BKBF yesterday and she is SO COOL.)
  2. On Writing by Stephen King: This is the one book on my list that is saying “here’s how I write, you should too”. But Stephen King is basically the most prolific writer ever, so I was happy to listen to his advice. Two points of his really stuck with me: 1. Adverbs are lazy and 2. Sometimes the best thing you can do for a story is put it down for a long timelike, 6 months or a yearand come back to it with eyes so fresh that it’s like you’re editing someone else’s story. I’d be interested to know what points of his sticks with you guys!
  3. Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott: I posted about this the other day, but this book is like my writing Bible. In fact, a friend of mine who doesn’t even write got to reading it, and he loved it, too. Basically if you’re a human with a goal, this book will help you. And Anne Lamott writes kinda like this wise, kind mother who isn’t afraid to also tell you what’s up. Whereas a lot of other books on writing are about the actual storytelling, I like this book because it’s more about the writer’s “lifestyle”. Go get it now so that we can gush together!
  4. The Philosophy of Composition by Edgar Allan Poe: This is actually just an essay, but considering that Poe is often credited with being the inventor of the modern short story, I had to include it on this list. It’s in this essay that Poe famously defined a short story as one that can be told in one sitting. Whereas King’s On Writing is really “zoomed in” on topics like word choice, this essay is a high level, theoretical piece on what a story actually is. You can get it for 99 cents on Kindle, or, even better, read it as part of a collection of all of his stories… ugh, they’re SO good!!!
  5. Elements of Style by Strunk & White: I cannot tell you how often I’ve received this little book as a giftfor high school graduation, for college graduation, and for many Christmases and birthdays. But it’s all good because it is kinda essential for a writer to have. Elements of Style is all aboutgasp!grammar. (I should probably give it a read-through again so that I can re-center and remember my grammatical skillz, actually!) Also, there are some cute versions out now that make it seem less snore-fest-yI really want this illustrated copy!

If you read any of these books and post quotes from them on your Tumblr, tag them #yeahwritingbooks and I’ll reblog you! 

Filed under books references

134 notes

Editing on the sentence level

the-right-writing:

Many people get hung up editing on the sentence level and see it as a chore. I used to be that way too, and it was for a very specific reason: I didn’t know what I was aiming to fix aside from general grammar issues. I knew I wanted my sentences to be better, but I did not have a firm grasp on what “better” meant. Now I do and I find sentence level editing fun.

To make your sentences better, you can:

  • Make sure it conveys the meaning you want it to.
  • Make it succinct and delete any extraneous words. (Though never at the sacrifice of meaning. It’s better to have a clunky paragraph that says what you want than a short but confusing sentence that doesn’t get the point across.)
  • If you have two descriptions of the same thing from the same POV, choose your favorite and delete the second.
  • See if you can change weak verbs or rearrange the sentence to exclude them.
  • Alter the sentence so that it enhances the voice of the POV character (or the story, if you’re writing third person omniscient).

Filed under editing

82 notes

Ranged weapons

the-right-writing:

What is it about ranged weapons that makes authors write only about the BESTEST most SPECIALEST users of them? Sure, if you read a lot, you’re find swordsmen who are way too good at it or spear wielders who can beat anybody as long as they have their spear on hand, but not nearly to the extent as the way too good at it archers and gunmen. It’s okay and actually preferable to make your human characters humanly good at ranged weapons. You don’t have to write them making impossible shots every second of the day. They can even miss sometimes. On another note, if they hit a bulls-eye with a bullet or arrow every time, that means the target is too close for accurate measurement. It should be moved back and made smaller until they stop hitting the bulls-eye.

Filed under weapons combat

23,364 notes

sixpenceee:

There are a bunch of creepy short films/art/games/lists floating around my blog and people have often messaged me asking for where they are. So here is a post organizing those types of content on my blog.
Every time I make another post about a short film, horror art, game or list it will be updated here. This post can be found on the masterpost tag on my blog. 
CREEPY & COOL SHORT FILMS
Play With Me
Memoria
Mother Died
The Laundromat
The Mockingbird
Mysterious Strangers
The Little Mermaid
Mind Control Made Easy
Metalosis Maligna
Blood Mary Short Film
The Boy & His Atom
Under the Bed
The Easter Bunny Is Eating My Candy
White With Red
Something Under the Bed
The Smiling Man
The Maker
Blackwater Gospel
Zero
Doll Face
Cargo
CREEPY ONLINE GAMES
The Deepest Sleep
Milk for the Ugly
Everyday the Same Dream
Escape from the Haunted Room
Perdition
Joralemon
Entity
Coma
Alter Ego
Urbex
The Burning Room
99 Rooms
The Company of Myself
Take This Lollipop
Covetus
Annie96 is Typing
Dreams of Your Life
Ellie Help Me Out Please
TOP 10’S & COMPILATIONS & LISTS
Creepy Contacts
Top 10 Sixpenceee Stories
Top 10 Reddit Lets Not Meet Stories
Top 10 Creepy Short Films
Compilation of Iconic Images
Compilation of Short Creepy Stories
Top 10 Morbid Scientific Phenomena 
3D Audio Compilation
World’s Oldest Things
Top 10 Essential Documentaries
Unsettling Things on the Internet
Top 10 Terrifying YouTube Videos
Top 5 Sad Audio Recordings
Top 10 Creepy Audio Recordings
Creepy Dares List
Creepy Facts Compilation
Top 5 Disturbing Topics
Top 5 Fake Documentaries
6 Terrifying Comics
Top 10 Disturbing Documentaries
Common Nightmares & Their Meanings
Creepy Japanese Urban Legends
Creepy Lost Episodes Compilation
Compilation of Horror Pranks
Top 10 Interesting Documentaries
Top 5 Mass Extinctions
Glitch in the Matrix
CREEPY & COOL ART
Marc Quinn, Frozen Blood
Cardboard Creations
Post It Monsters
Fantasy Mermaid Sculptures 
Urban Decay Photographs
Duane Michel
Choi Xoo Ang
The Grotesque Work of Lee Dong Wook
Melted Casette Tape Skeletons
Cabinet of Monstrosities 
Creepy Sculpture Park
Bodies of Wisdom
The Ride
Feather Child
Gem Stone Skulls
Plastic Utensil Sculpture 
Ceramic Lady Gore
Realistic Action Figures

sixpenceee:

There are a bunch of creepy short films/art/games/lists floating around my blog and people have often messaged me asking for where they are. So here is a post organizing those types of content on my blog.

Every time I make another post about a short film, horror art, game or list it will be updated here. This post can be found on the masterpost tag on my blog. 

CREEPY & COOL SHORT FILMS

CREEPY ONLINE GAMES

TOP 10’S & COMPILATIONS & LISTS

CREEPY & COOL ART

(via melcantus)

Filed under references horror

2,231 notes

art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right
by Randy McCall
Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.
Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.
Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.
Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.
The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.
One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.
Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.
So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.
A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

art-of-swords:

Why a sword feels right

  • by Randy McCall

Many readers will have had the experience of shopping for modern, practical cutting swords, both replicas of ancient swords and modern designs. One of the most common tips given to new sword-shoppers is to pick up and try out many different swords “until you find one that feels right for you”. Rarely is any explanation given for precisely what this means.

Shoppers presume it has something to do with whether the hilt is the right size for their hand, or that it has something to do with the sword’s “balance”… whatever that is.

Some lucky few will have had the chance to handle high quality antique weapons.  Those who have are often shocked that these blades — often of the same weight and length as the modern replica blade they use at home — have a completely different “feel”.

Often master blades seem lighter than than their actual weight, with a sense of “liveliness” (easy to rotate in the hand), and with the feeling to make almost effortless cuts or thrusts. This isn’t to criticize the sword makers of today — there are master swordsmiths around the world — but to demonstrate the skill and genius of the weapon makers of old.

The basic question then is why is there a difference between how these swords feel, and how can a sword practitioner use this knowledge to their advantage? There have been a number of papers, articles and discussion threads on this topic, often delving into physics formula to define and explain mathematically how and why a sword feels, moves and strikes as it does.

One of the main resources for this will be “Dynamics of Hand-Held Impact Weapons” by George Turner; a fairly technical exploration of the physics behind why swords handle as they do (and an indispensable resource for those interested in designing good swords). There are also several other articles, plus web forum discussion threads, which explore this area which we’ll draw on.

Never fear though; we’ll leave the calculations behind and focus on the practical applications. Those who wish to see the maths can check the links in the Sources section.

So, let’s start off with a few basics. We’ll presume that the swords you’re looking at are well designed, have properly sized hilt grips, etc., so we can ignore the ergonomic factors.

A sword has several physical characteristics which can affect both its feel in the hand and how it handles. Let’s take a look at these, along with examples of how you would check these while inspecting your blade…

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Art of Cutting

(via ithums)

Filed under weapons combat reference

84,665 notes

A weird thing I find incredibly helpful for art/writing.

heecawroo:

deadcantdraw:

Eplans.com is a website that sells blueprints for houses. 

This might not seem that helpful but if you want a characters house you can make selections based on what sort of house you want them to live in. 

image

Then browse through the results and find the house you want. Then you can view the blueprints and have a room layout for that house, which can help with visualising the space they live in. 

image

It makes describing generic homes so much easier.

thank you

(Source: eplans.com, via aestatecantus)

Filed under resources housing homes buildings