phoenix writes

or procrastinates, one of the two

73,903 notes

Sak Yant or Yantra Tattooing are  believed to give the wearer magic powers associated with healing, luck, strength, and protection against evil.

You can get these here in thailand by a monk, they look beautiful but I’d never recommend it. Essentially, you’re making a pact with a spirit to protect you in exchange for sacrificing an activity or habit you may have previously enjoyed (the monk decides what this is, not you). These tattoos are contracts. 
 Breaking your side of the bargain may encourage the spirit to ‘punish’ you, and these contracts are not easily voided. 

(Source: gn-a, via chromaticore)

Filed under tattoos interesting stuff ideas

3,038 notes

When in doubt, the rule of threes is a rule that plays well with all of storytelling. When describing a thing? No more than three details. A character’s arc? Three beats. A story? Three acts. An act? Three sequences. A plot point culminating in a mystery of a twist? At least three mentions throughout the tale. This is an old rule, and a good one. It’s not universal — but it’s a good place to start. –
Chuck Wendig (via writingquotes)

Filed under quotes

7,284 notes

Basic checklist for your story

the-right-writing:

This checklist can be used during both planning and editing stages.

Your Protagonist

  • Does your protagonist have a personality beyond being heroic and nice?
  • Does your protagonist have agency?
  • Does your protagonist’s personality change?
  • Did your protagonist have a life and relationships before the events of the story?
  • Does your protagonist have flaws?
  • Is your protagonist active as opposed to passive or reactive?

Your Setting

  • Is your setting described well enough that readers can imagine themselves there?
  • Is your setting used or described differently than similar settings by other authors?
  • Do readers have a sense that your world extends outside the events of your story?
  • Does your setting have its own unique atmosphere aside from being a backdrop for your plot?
  • Is it important that the events in your story take place in this setting and not another?

Your Romantic Subplot/Plot (if applicable)

  • Does the relationship have flaws?
  • Does the relationship take time to develop?
  • Does the love interest have their own personality beyond their romantic traits?
  • Does the love interest have agency both inside and outside the relationship?
  • Does the love interest have flaws?

Your Major Non-Protagonist Characters

  • Do your major characters have varying opinions on your protagonist?
  • Do your major characters have traits outside of their relationships with the protagonist?
  • Do your major characters have varying gender identities, races, ability statuses, and sexual orientations, unless there is a good plot reason otherwise (such as the story taking place mainly at a male prison or a gay bar)?
  • Do your major characters have different worldviews and senses of morality?
  • Do most of your major characters have agency?
  • Do your major characters have flaws?
  • Do all of your major characters need to be there?
  • Do most of your major characters’ personalities change?

Your Minor and Background Characters

  • Do most of your minor characters have something that makes them interesting and memorable?
  • Do your minor characters have varying gender identities, races, ability statuses, and sexual orientations, unless there is a good plot reason otherwise (such as the story taking place mainly at a male prison or a gay bar)?
  • Do all of your minor characters need to be there?

Your Antagonist

  • Does your antagonist have a reasonable motive for their actions?
  • Does your antagonist have agency?
  • Has your antagonist done enough to be taken seriously?
  • Does your antagonist have good traits?
  • Does your antagonist have traits outside of their relationship with the protagonist?

Your Plot

  • Do your scenes flow logically?
  • Are all of your questions either answered or left unanswered for a reason?
  • Are there too many coincidences?
  • Does your plot begin at the perfect spot?
  • Does your plot end at the perfect spot?
  • Is there conflict?
  • Are there any scenes that could be left out?
  • Does your plot happen because of the actions, reactions, and decisions of your characters?

Your Mechanics

  • Are there any spelling or grammatical errors?
  • Are there any sentences that could be left out?
  • Are most of your sentences active instead of passive?
  • Do you use mostly strong verbs (ex: drank, ran) instead of weak verbs (ex: was, did)?
  • Do you use too many adverbs?
  • Are your sentences varied in structure?

Filed under story checklist list planning

328 notes

Things I wish were more variable in fictional alien races

the-right-writing:

When trying to make aliens different from humans, authors often make them no more different than human cultures are from each other. Here are some areas where aliens are often too human since authors don’t even think of them as things to change. Obviously, if your aliens aren’t supposed to be very different from humans, this post is not for you.

  • Dunbar’s number
  • How easily they get along with each other
  • Methods of communication
  • Sense of self
  • Sense of beauty
  • The way free time is spent
  • Number of senses
  • Types of emotion

Note that though a hive mind differs on almost all of these points, hive minds are themselves cliche.

Filed under aliens sci-fi non-human character creation race creation

1,020 notes

thewritershelpers:

What In the Name of Merlin Is Magic, Anyway?

In this installment of the TWH Fighting Series, we’re going to explore magic in some of its possible forms, ways to cast and use magic, and most importantly, balancing out magic vs. other means of fighting in a scene.

Read More

Filed under magic fighting

371 notes

When I asked an agent recently how she decided whether or not to take on a manuscript, she told me she asked for the first fifty pages and read the first sentence. If she liked the first sentence, she read the second. If she liked that one, she read the third, and so on. If she reached the end of the first fifty pages without putting the manuscript down, she signed it up.
Granted, most readers are willing to read your second sentence even if the first one isn’t brilliant, but the agent’s answer shows the importance of “hook.” If you don’t grab your readers within, say, your first fifty pages, you won’t have them at all.
David King (via writingquotes)

Filed under writing agents hook